Camouflage clothes: In fashion and in real life

Nan and her son Creed in Arizona

Nan and her son Creed in Arizona

Sometimes I write about fashion trends that are on a high. Other times I tell you about a trend that doesn’t really fly. Camouflage prints – those mottled olive green and gray patterns – are one of those trends that work elsewhere, but not here.

On my recent buying trips I saw a lot of camouflage prints trending for fall. I saw all kinds of camouflage prints on shoes, handbags, pants, shirts, and accessories. However, my experience with previous surges in camouflage fashion wear has taught me that this is not a favorite trend of El Paso women. So you won’t be seeing many camo-print items at Tres Mariposas this year.

On the other hand, over the last few years, I have developed a whole other kind of interest in my camouflage clothing, an awareness that was heightened this weekend. Lots of mothers can relate to my reason for this interest: I have a son serving in the military.

My husband and I took a weekend road trip to Tucson, the home of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, to see him and I couldn’t have been more proud. Creed recently returned from Afghanistan, where he flew rescue missions, piloting high-tech Pave Hawk helicopters.

Creed has done an excellent job of trying to protect his mom from fearful thinking. “Oh, Mom, this deployment (his third), I’m pretty bored.  Not so much to do.”  This has fed so nicely into my tendency toward denial!

Now that he is back, I learned that, yes, he was bored some.  But in between the boredom, he and his crew were doing their real job:  flying into the heat of battle, facing enemy fire, and working their high adrenaline butts off to save the critically wounded.

You may have caught the very interesting National Geographic Series “Inside Combat Rescue,” where embedded cameramen followed Creed’s unit for four months. The series premiered in February.

Watching the program, I was keenly aware of how strong my denial had been. I am so relieved that he is back in the States! We had a great weekend, including fine dining at Anthony’s in Tucson and a mind-cleansing hike in the beautiful Sonoran Desert mountains. For a brief while, we were able to put military camouflage out of our minds.

“Now, for the first time in history, the United States Air Force is allowing cameras to follow these highly skilled airmen, with advanced medical training, to war…. With strategically placed cameras on airmen’s helmets and more than 40 cameras mounted both inside and outside of the Air Force’s HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopters, National Geographic Channel joins more than two dozen active missions, capturing each heart-pounding, unfiltered moment of war as never before. “When a soldier is down and time is running out, an elite unit of Air Force rescue warriors will risk their own lives to rescue those injured and clinging to life. In Afghanistan and around the world, Pararescuemen or PJs; their leaders, Combat Rescue officers; and their PaveHawk helicopter teammates fly into the heat of battle, often facing imminent enemy threats, to save the critically wounded. They’re part warrior, part guardian angel, part medic and ALL hero.” -- from National Geographic Channel’s program notes

“Now, for the first time in history, the United States Air Force is allowing cameras to follow these highly skilled airmen, with advanced medical training, to war…. With strategically placed cameras on airmen’s helmets and more than 40 cameras mounted both inside and outside of the Air Force’s HH-60G Pave Hawk helicopters, National Geographic Channel joins more than two dozen active missions, capturing each heart-pounding, unfiltered moment of war as never before.
“When a soldier is down and time is running out, an elite unit of Air Force rescue warriors will risk their own lives to rescue those injured and clinging to life. In Afghanistan and around the world, Pararescuemen or PJs; their leaders, Combat Rescue officers; and their PaveHawk helicopter teammates fly into the heat of battle, often facing imminent enemy threats, to save the critically wounded. They’re part warrior, part guardian angel, part medic and ALL hero.”
– from National Geographic Channel’s program notes

 

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